Peer-reviewed Articles

Please use the archived list on the right to look at past peer-reviewed articles.

2017

Ngo,W., Srinivasan,S., Houtman,D., Jones,L. The relief of dry eye signs and symptoms using a combination of lubricants, lid hygiene and ocular nutraceuticals. Journal of Optometry 2017;10,1:26-33. [ Show Abstract ]

Purpose To determine the combined effect of TheraTears® Lubricant Eye Drops, TheraTears® SteriLid Eyelid Cleanser, and TheraTears® Nutrition on dry eye signs and symptoms. Methods This prospective study enrolled 28 dry eye participants. Participants were instructed to use the Lubricant Eye Drops at least 2–4× a day, SteriLid 1–2× a day, and Nutrition 3 gel caps once a day. Participants were followed up at baseline, 1 month and 3 months. Outcome variables were the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI), Symptom Assessment iN Dry Eye (SANDE) questionnaire, non-invasive tear break-up time (NIBUT), osmolarity, number of meibomian glands blocked (#MG blocked), meibum quality, eyelid margin features, Schirmer's test, tear film lipid layer thickness (LLT), meniscus height, corneal and conjunctival staining. Results Twenty participants (mean age = 43, from 23 to 66, 17F, 3M) completed the study. Participants reported having used, on average, the Lubricant Eye Drop 2.4×/day, the SteriLid 1.1×/day, and the Nutrition 3 gel caps 1×/day. There was a significant change over time (p < 0.05) for OSDI (-21.2 points), SANDE (-32.4 points), NIBUT (+0.43 s), eyelid margin features (-1.1 grade), meibum quality (-1.0 grade), and #MG blocked (-4.0 glands). Conclusion By using a combination of TheraTears® Lubricant Eye Drop, SteriLid, and Nutrition, patients experience significant relief in both dry eye symptoms and signs. © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry

Ngo,W., Srinivasan,S., Keech,A., Keir,N., Jones,L. Self versus examiner administration of the Ocular Surface Disease Index©. Journal of Optometry 2017;10,1:34-42. [ Show Abstract ]

Purpose To compare the difference in Ocular Surface Disease Index© (OSDI) scores when participants were given the OSDI to complete on their own (self-guided, SG), versus under the guidance of the examiner (examiner-guided, EG). Methods 100 participants enrolled in this prospective two-visit study (fifty under-45 years old, 38F/12M; and fifty 45 years-and-older, 42F/8M). Participants who scored =1 on the Subjective Evaluation of Symptoms of Dryness (SESoD) were included in this study. Participants completed the OSDI SG during the first visit. Participants returned the next day and repeated the OSDI, but with EG (with standardized instructions). Participants were under deception and believed that they were comparing the OSDI to the SESoD. Results The mean OSDI score of the SG and EG administration was 32.0 ± 17.3 and 33.8 ± 19.6 respectively (p > 0.05) with 95% limits of agreement between -20.6 and +24.2. The correlation between SG and EG administration was Spearman's r = 0.81, p 0.05) for both the under-45 group, and 45-and-older group. The 95% limits of agreement for the under-45 group were smaller than the 45-and-older group (under-45: [-15.5, +13.1,], 45-and-older: [-23.3, +32.2]). A significant difference was found between 8 of the 12 questions items (all p = 0.01). However, the mean difference for each was <0.6 and was not considered to be clinically significant. Conclusion There was no clinically significant difference in OSDI score between SG and EG administration, however having instructions provided with EG administration affected variability of scores in the older group more than the younger group. © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry